What stillness does for our writing.

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Movement is a crucial part of wellness.

It rightfully commands a lot of our attention in this sedentary culture.

And yet, stillness may be equally crucial.

After all, we find wellness in the oscillation between states. I love to quote Martha Beck on this: Play until you want to rest, then rest until you want to play.

And rest is not just sleep. One of the deepest forms of rest is complete, intentional, mind-body stillness — done while you’re awake.

I wanted to know more about the magic behind this. I came to this week’s guest expert, mindfulness-based therapist Ronit Jinich, with questions:

How much stillness do we need? Why do you meditate as long as you do?

And what do you make of the internal interruptions — the doubts that not even the quietest of rooms can silence?

I was fascinated by Ronit’s refreshing thoughts and reframes.

If you have a meditation practice already, our interview will help you understand how it can better support your writing practice. If you don’t meditate, our interview might show your writing practice to you in a different light.

Be well,


Listen here:  (The transcript of this conversation can be found on the site.)



About Ronit Jinich: 

Ronit is a dharmatherapist in private practice working at the interface of Eastern and Western understandings and approaches to human psychology.

Her mind-body approach is informed by her exploration of these disciplines and traverses various schools of thought as well as communities of practice for over 15 years.

Born in México, she is fluent in Spanish, English and Hebrew. Ronit benefits from a diverse academic background spanning from literature to performing arts and Gestalt Therapy. She holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Studies with a focus on self as social transformation from York University.

Ronit is the Manager of Education & Lead Facilitator for Mindfulness Without Borders, a leading provider of evidence-based programs on secular mindfulness and social-emotional intelligence to youth, educators, health and corporate professionals in communities around the world.

She is the founder of Dharma Praxis, home of The Living Room, a community dedicated to exploring the principles and practice of mindfulness in everyday life. Ronit is also a faculty member of the Applied Mindfulness Meditation Certificate Program at the University of Toronto.


Photo credit: Khloe Arledge on Unsplash.


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4 comments

Cheryl Archer

Loved listening to this interview. Learning about what a daily meditation practice can do for me as well as how it can support my writing practice (I’m amazed how similar these two practices are!) was completely fascinating. Thanks so very much to both of you—Sarah and Ronit Jinich!
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Sarah Selecky

Thank you, Cheryl! I loved this conversation too, and it is bringing my meditation practice back to life.
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Stephen D. Forman

During our last Centered call, I was struck by how many writers are also meditators... or should I say, how many meditators are also writers. In your interview with Ronit Jinich, you called the two practices "close sisters." Indeed. A fellow writer described returning to the Daily Prompts after an absence, and always feeling re-awakened for having done so. It reminded me of this kindness: "No need to follow every breath, just this next breath." But one problem I find with mindfulness practice is-- ironically-- how effective it is at teaching me to forgive my non-striving self. I'm apt to point myself in a general direction, then live in the moment and trust in the outcome. While this attitude has made me happy, my writing has languished (which makes me unhappy). ~~Steve
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Sarah Selecky

I relate to this, Steve. It's a regular thing: trying to re-balance my "acceptance of what is" with my desire and energy to create, and knowing what is creative rest and what is procrastination. This summer I've been not writing more than I have been writing, wondering if/when I should introduce a different kind of discipline. But -- maybe now because autumn is around the corner -- I feel a craving for writing again. Eventually, if I pay attention, will it become more delicious to write than to sit, in the same way it has recently felt more delicious to sit than to write? We will see!
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