Radiant Shimmering Light: In conversation with Steph Jagger

Cuba Dog, Camilla by Stacy Milrany

I was just in Seattle!

I had a Radiant Shimmering Light book signing and conversation with author Steph Jagger. I was so excited to speak with her, but due to traveling snafus, I missed most of the event.

But then guess what happened?

Steph (who, by the way, is a magic-maker) invited watercolorist, entrepreneur, and pet portrait artist Stacy Milrany* to come in my place. They had a fantastic conversation about creativity, business, art, and friendship that night.

I arrived late, but still in time to meet everyone and sign books.

A few days later, Steph and I met at her gorgeous home in the middle of a lush forest on Bainbridge Island. We sat in her living room and recorded this conversation to share with you, now.

Steph’s questions are intelligent, articulate, and probing. We talked about writing, art, business, books, consumption and authenticity — both in Radiant Shimmering Light and in real life.

I hope you enjoy listening to our conversation.  

[audio m4a="https://www.sarahseleckywritingschool.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/StephJaggerandSarahSelecky.m4a"][/audio]

If you’ve read Radiant Shimmering Light and anything in our discussion strikes a chord with you, please join the conversation: leave your comments below.

xo,


Image (top): Cuba Dog, Camilla by Stacy Milrany

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase something using one of these links, I may earn a commission. I only recommend books or products I trust.


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4 comments

Stephen D. Forman

Thank you for this interview-- I learned so much about Radiant Shimmering Light! At the book reading with Steph and Stacy that evening, the theme of authenticity was front and center, especially as it pertains to brands (eg Is North Face a more "authentic" company than, say, Chateau Ste. Michelle Wines, owned by Altria Tobacco?) I say this, because in one of my newsletters this morning I read the following re Amazon Prime Day: "This year Amazon is tapping a lot of celebrities, from Kobe Bryant to JoJo Siwa, to join in promoting products during its made-up shopping holiday. Amazon didn't used to do celebs. 'It’s amazing how much the needle has moved in the other direction,' Steve Susi, a former Amazon advertising executive, tells Bloomberg News. 'We were told that [Amazon CEO] Jeff Bezos resisted celebrity endorsements because it just seemed so inauthentic and un-Amazonian.'" So I ask: huh??? Is it even possible for the world's largest store to BE authentic? And if not, what does it matter? It clearly hasn't bothered most anyone, or else Amazon wouldn't have grown to its gargantuan size. Or does authenticity only matter when your products aren't the lowest-priced?
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Sarah Selecky

Thanks, Grace! Yes... and while I know this kind of reading takes more effort, because it requires active participation from the reader -- I have to remind myself that this might be an acquired taste. Not just in stories, but in all kinds of art forms! But I'm like you -- I love to read stories with complications. The best books are the ones I find myself thinking about for a long time. :)
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Sarah Selecky

This feels so... weird. Are we at the point now where Amazon's actually branding itself as authentic? And if that's the case, what does that word even mean? "Real"?
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Grace Jeschke

Wow! Thank you. Listening to this, I want to reread the book and listen again to this interview. I was intrigued (though not surprised) by the question about the "takeaway" at the end of a story. Much as I grew up on fairy tales and myths, to me a good story doesn't have a simple answer. Instead it gives space to possibility, and for more than one character/perspective -- as in the novel and the interview.
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